Articles about Morelia
Culture

La Fundación de Morelia (The Foundation of Morelia)

by: Travel by México

La Fundación de Morelia (The Foundation of Morelia), Morelia
Culture

La Fundación de Morelia (The Foundation of Morelia)

by: Travel by México

The city of Morelia is the capital of the state of Michoacan and has been the birthplace of important figures like Don Jose Maria Morelos, Dona Josefa Ortiz de Dominguez and Agustin de Iturbide.
Before the arrival of the Spaniards, the area was inhabited by an indigenous group known as the Pirindas and received the name of Guayangareo which means "Loma Larga and Achatada."

During evangelism, the first to arrive at the region were the Franciscans, who settled in the Convent of San Buenaventura in 1531 from where it began to build the new town  .
On May 18, 1541 was founded the villa of Nueva Mechuacan" by decree of the viceroy of New Spain Don Antonio de Mendoza and four years later received the title of city. In 1545 the King of Spain, Felipe II gave the order to rename it "Valladolid."

Despite the creation of this great city, the civil and ecclesiastical powers were based in Patzcuaro and it was not until the death of the first bishop of Michoacan, Don Vasco de Quiroga, who moved to Valladolid in 1580 as well as  some schools , bringing the development of the city accelerated.
The precursor of Independence Don Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla lived in Valladolid for several years. There, it began to assemble a plan to reveal theirselves against the yoke of the conquerors. In 1810, the priest Hidalgo draw up the abolition of slavery in the building located at number 403 on the street of Allende.

For most of the independence movement, Valladolid was in the hands of the realists, until the consummation of the same.
On September 12, 1828 Valladolid ceased to exist to give way to a new city of an independent country: Morelia, in honor of Morelos, insurgent native of the town.
On December 12, 1991 the World Heritage Committee of UNESCO agreed to enroll Morelia in the list of World Heritage.
The Historical Center of Morelia is among the 112 cities in the earth that are considered "Wonders of the World." It has 1113 monuments, a set of great value, because of its formal characteristics on its buildings, volumetric harmony, constructive quality and plastic unity on which represent the various architectural styles developed over the centuries, creating a local style, as eloquent testimony for the architectural history of the nation.